Hildegarde Haas Woodcuts and Paintings

The following is a selection of works from American painter and printmaker Hildegarde Haas (1926-2002).
Left: Canyon Walls-Noon, 1953, color woodcut ?/16, 16.75" x 11.75".  M. Lee Stone Fine Prints, $425 at post
Right: NIght, 1948, color woodcut 1/14, 16" x 8".  Annex Galleries, $600 at time of post

Orvieto, 1957, color woodcut ?/4, 7" x 9". M. Lee Stone Fine Prints. $275 at time of post

Rocky Shore, 1950, color woodcut ?/16, 11.25" x 18". M. Lee Stone Fine Prints. $700 at time of post

Trees and Mountains, 1947, color woodcut 2/7, 6.5" x 8". Annex Galleries, $400 at time of post

Wooded Point, 1950, color woodcut 6/14, 11.5" x 16.125". Annex Galleries, $750 at time of post

Red Mesa, ca. 1960's, oil on masonite, 21" x 25.5". Clars Auction Gallery, sold $325 in 2010

Boulders of the Deep, ca. 1960's, oil on masonite, 28" x 36". Clars Auction Gallery, sold $350 in 2010

Mountain Meadow, ca. 1960's, oil on masonite, 16" x 20". Clars Auction Gallery, sold $350 in 2010

untitled, ca. 1970's, watercolor on paper, 18" x 12". Ebay at time of post starting bid $195

untitled, ca. 1970's, watercolor on paper, 12" x 18". Ebay at time of post starting bid $195

The Glass Blower, 1957, acrylic on masonite, 32" x 26". Clars Auction Gallery, sold $475 in 2007

Greek Chorus, 1949, casein on cardboard, 12.5" x 24". Clars Auction Gallery, sold in 2007

Hildegarde Haas (1926-2002) was born in Frankfurt, Germany in 1926. Her family immigrated to America when she was a child, settling in Dallas, Texas in 1938. She enrolled in an accelerated study program at the University of Chicago; earning her B.A. and graduating with honors within 2 years. In 1946 she attended the Art Students League in New York City on a scholarship, where she studied under American modernist Vaclav Vytlacil. Hildegarde was a self taught printmaker who began experimenting with the woodcut art form during her time at ASL. Throughout the late 40's and early 50's she continued to hone her woodcutting skills, gaining national recognition for her prints. However, by 1953 the rigor and physical demands of carving became too much and she exchanged her gouges for a set of paint brushes.

Most of her pieces were influenced by her love of the outdoors; when asked to describe what inspires her she replied "I am primarily interested in landscape as a theme in order to discover the underlying patterns and hidden order in the world around me". Hildegarde's work is in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art, The Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Library of Congress.

If you are interested in purchasing a Hildegarde Haas print check M. Lee Stone Fine Prints and Annex Galleries.  The other pieces shown above are from Clars Auction Gallery.

2 comments:

findingfabulous said...

HI just discovered your blog and emailed a question. What a great resource. I am looking forward to following your inspiration and hopefully the opening of your studio

Kevin said...

Thanks for the kind words!